Backstage at San Francisco Opera > July 2013 > 12 Operatic Lessons for the new Royal Baby
12 Operatic Lessons for the new Royal Baby
With the arrival of the newest member of the British royal family, we here at San Francisco Opera decided to take a look at the members of nobility seen throughout opera to see what kind of lessons they could impart to the world's newest prince. Compiled here are a selection of lessons from twelve of our favorite operas that we think will serve the future king well.

Young prince, remember...



1) JUST BECAUSE YOU CAN HAVE EVERY WOMAN IN THE COMMONWEALTH DOESN'T MEAN YOU SHOULD.


The Duke of Mantua woos Countess Ceprano in our 2012 production of Rigoletto.
Photo by Cory Weaver.

2) IF YOU MEET A PRINCESS WHO MAKES YOU SOLVE THREE RIDDLES IN ORDER TO WIN HER HAND (AND KEEP YOUR HEAD),
SHE'S PROBABLY PRETTY HIGH MAINTENANCE.



Princess Turandot stares imperiously at Prince Calaf in our 2011 production of Turandot. Photo by Cory Weaver.
 
3) DON'T MAKE PROMISES TO SLIGHTLY DERANGED MEMBERS OF YOUR FAMILY. YOU NEVER KNOW WHAT YOU'LL HAVE TO GIVE THEM.
 

King Herod regrets his decision to give Salome anything she wants in our 2009 production of Salome. Photo by Cory Weaver.
 
4) IF YOU MEET A BEAUTIFUL, MYSTERIOUS VEILED WOMAN AT A BALL, DON'T LET HER SLIP AWAY.
 

Angelina, (Cenerentola, or Cinderella) veiled in disguise, meets Prince Ramiro in the 2008 Merola production of La Cenerentola. Photo by Kristen Loken.
 
5) ON SECOND THOUGHT, VEILED WOMEN CAN BE TROUBLE. AND FOR HEAVEN'S SAKE, WATCH YOUR BACK AT A MASQUERADE.
 

Amelia, wife of Anckarstrom, wears a veil to meet her secret love, Gustavo, King of Sweden. Misunderstandings ensue and lead to Gustavo's end in our 2006 production of Un Ballo in Maschera (A Masked Ball). Photo by Terrence McCarthy.
 
6) IF YOU MEET SOMEONE IN BUCKINGHAM PALACE WHO CALLS HERSELF THE "QUEEN OF THE NIGHT," SHE'S PROBABLY NOT WHO YOU THINK SHE IS.
 

The Queen of the Night makes quite an entrance in our 2012 production of The Magic Flute. Photo by Cory Weaver.
 
7) DON'T PURSUE THE LOVE OF YOUR BROTHER'S LIFE. NOT ONLY DOES IT MAKE YOU LOOK BAD, BUT YOU MIGHT END UP MARRIED TO THE PERSON
YOU NO LONGER WANT.

 

King Xerxes attempts to woo Romilda, the love of his brother Arsamenes, in our
2011 production of Xerxes. Photo by Cory Weaver.
 
8) EGYPTIAN PRINCESSES CAN GET VERY JEALOUS. LIKE I'M-GOING-TO-BURY-YOU-ALIVE-WITH-YOUR-GIRLFRIEND-IF-YOU-DON'T-LOVE-ME JEALOUS.
PROCEED WITH CAUTION.

 

Princess Amneris is none too pleased that Radames doesn't share her affections in our 2010 production of Aida. Photo by Cory Weaver.
 
9) LOVE MEANS NEVER HAVING TO PUT A FAMILY MEMBER INTO AN ENCHANTED SLEEP IN A
RING OF FIRE.
 




Wotan, King of the Gods, puts daughter Brunnhilde in an enchanted slumber because she disobeys him in our 2011 production of Die Walkure. And you thought no ice cream for a week was punishment. Photo by Cory Weaver.
 
10) IF SOMEONE SAYS THEY ARE RUSSIAN NOBILITY FROM THE TIME OF TROUBLES, RUN. SERIOUSLY. IT USUALLY ENDS BADLY.
 

 
Prince Shuisky plots away in our 2008 production of Boris Godunov. Photo by Terrence McCarthy.
 
11) WITCHES BE CRAZY.
DON'T LISTEN TO THEIR ADVICE.

 


The witches toil and trouble in our 2008 production of Macbeth.
Photo by Terrence McCarthy.
 
12) IF YOU FIND YOURSELF SURROUNDED BY A 'VICTORIOUS HORDE,' THE MONARCHY HAS GONE IN A VERY DIFFERENT DIRECTION.
CONSIDER MOVING.

 


Attila the Hun reflects on his pillaging ways in our 2012 production of Attila.
Photo by Cory Weaver.
Posted: 7/23/2013 3:47:26 PM by San Francisco Opera
Filed under: 2011-12Season, 2012-13Season, Attila, Baby, MarkDelavan, mozart, Puccini, Rigoletto, Royal, themagicflute, Turandot, Verdi, Wagner, Xerxes


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