On Sunday, September 25, some 16,000 fans gathered at AT&T Park, home to World Series champions the San Francisco Giants, to watch and listen as an ice princess melted, bureaucrats blustered, and high notes were hit out of the park. Despite a gloomy weather forecast, those who took a chance were rewarded with a beautiful, mild San Francisco day, including sunshine and sailboats in the bay. For the Opera’s sixth annual ballpark simulcast, Puccini’s Turandot was transmitted live from the Opera House to the Ballpark across 2.5 miles of fiber optic cable. The relaxed venue lent itself to sharing the experience with others, as scores of tweets from the audience captured an afternoon at the ballpark with Puccini. [All photos from @SFOpera Twitter feed]
Posted: 09/26/2011 by San Francisco Opera


Through state-of-the-art technology, San Francisco Opera’s simulcast on September 25 will be transmitted in 1920x1080 high definition (HD) to AT&T Park's 103-feet wide Mitsubishi Electric Diamond Vision scoreboard—one of the highest quality outdoor scoreboards in the nation—live from the stage of the War Memorial Opera House. [Left: Members of our Media Team before a performance. Photo by Cory Weaver.]

 

Posted: 09/22/2011 by Francis Crossman (Senior Video Editor)


Are you getting anxious for this year’s Opera at the Ballpark? We presented our first free simulcast at AT&T Park in 2007, and in the years since it has easily become one of the most beloved Bay Area traditions. Last year’s simulcast of Aida attracted an unprecedented crowd of 32,000 people—and that doesn’t count the nearly 3,000 more who were watching back at the Opera House!

 

 

Posted: 09/20/2011 by San Francisco Opera


Opera designer and director John Pascoe created the designs for this fanciful and opulent production of Donizetti's Lucrezia Borgia in 2008 with Washington National Opera and Renee Fleming.

With the opening of our third opera of the season less than a week away, we decided to whet your appetite with John Pascoe's gorgeous costume sketches for this production, which marks the first time we have ever ever presented the opera in our history.

Posted: 09/19/2011 by John Pascoe (Director & Designer, Lucrezia Borgia)


Costume designer Jess Goldstein took on a big job when he signed on to design the many costumes for the world premire of Heart of a Soldier. The opera spans six decades and four continents. Just the soldiers alone must be outfitted in gear appropriate for World War II, early 1960s Rhodesia and the Vietnam War. The main characters, Rick Rescorla, his best friend Dan Hill and his wife Susan Rescorla, are not mythical characters but real people--Dan and Susan will be attending this opera when it opens on September 10. To find inspiration for the look of each of the main character's costumes as well as the various locations and time periods depicted, Jess assembled a collection of design inspiration boards. Read on to see the images that inpired each of the costumes seen in Heart of a Soldier.

Posted: 08/17/2011 by Jess Goldstein (Costume Desinger, Heart of a Soldier)


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Introduction

Backstage at San Francisco Opera is a fascinating, fast-moving, mysterious and sacred space for the Company’s singers, musicians, dancers, technicians and production crews. Musical and staging rehearsals are on-going, scenery is loaded in and taken out, lighting cues are set, costumes and wigs are moved around and everything is made ready to receive the audience. From the principal singers, chorus and orchestra musicians to the creative teams for each opera, in addition to the many talented folks who don’t take a bow on stage, this blog offers unique insight, both thought-provoking and light-hearted, into the life backstage at San Francisco Opera.

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