The bus stop. It's a place I often find myself spending time as an Adler Fellow. I currently live in the Inner Richmond area, which is a good forty minutes from the opera house, but you can't beat the rent or the myriad of multicultural cuisine just steps from your door. Every morning, I wait for the 38 bus with my fellow passengers in silence, and it never ceases to shock me when someone speaks to me. "How strange!" I think to myself, and wonder what it is about me or my demeanor that invites conversation. What gives people the courage to strike up a chat? Such is the subject matter of LOVE/HATE, a modern love story about two people who meet at...you guessed it...the bus stop. And just as life imitates art, art often imitates life.
Posted: 04/02/2012 by Marina Boudart Harris (Adler Fellow)


Since announcing the world première of Mark Adamo’s The Gospel of Mary Magdalene for the Spring/Summer of 2013, many subscribers have asked me why we chose to do an opera on this subject. My response is that this is one of the world’s great stories in a new and exciting version, written and performed by some of the most extraordinary artists in opera today. Some, though, have expressed bewilderment. “Mary Magdalene, sure: but a Gospel of Mary? My Bible includes only the Gospels of Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John! How can this be an opera?”

Posted: 03/28/2012 by David Gockley (General Director)


San Francisco Opera's Media Department works tirelessly to capture and produce the best and most stirring moments on stage. Below is a blog post from Media Coordinator and Assistant Video Director Jessica Shown-Morgan on her recent trip to see the co-production of Moby Dick at San Diego Opera. Moby Dick makes its Bay Area premiere at San Francisco Opera on October 10, 2012.



Posted: 03/27/2012 by Jessica Shown-Morgan (Assistant Video Director)


Why in the world would a 95-year-old-lady, doddering along with a cane, be asked to share her thoughts about the intricate world of opera? Because if you’ve traveled the world, as I have, to see 63 complete Ring cycles and countless other operas besides, you want the world to know why you’re so passionate about opera and why it’s so important to keep this priceless art form thriving. Opera has enriched my life beyond measure, and my financial support of San Francisco Opera—including my legacy gift—will help enrich the lives of others in the coming years.

Posted: 03/12/2012 by Verna Parino, Bel Canto member


I have received several inquiries into why we are performing our upcoming Magic Flute in English. It’s a good question that deserves an explanation.
 
In Mozart’s time (late 1700’s), Italian was the language of opera. The genre of Italian “opera seria” crossed the Alps and settled in Austria, Germany and England in particular. Audiences in Austria attended “court operas,” supported by the nobility and presented in theaters that were near–or a part of–royal or lordly palaces. One can remember the image of Mozart’s operas being performed in Vienna’s Burgtheater in the film Amadeus. Lots of powdered faces, white wigs and bitchy courtiers. After Cosi fan tutte, Mozart fell out of favor with the Austrian court and lost his salaried position. He was also losing his health.
 
Posted: 03/12/2012 by David Gockley (General Director)


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Introduction

Backstage at San Francisco Opera is a fascinating, fast-moving, mysterious and sacred space for the Company’s singers, musicians, dancers, technicians and production crews. Musical and staging rehearsals are on-going, scenery is loaded in and taken out, lighting cues are set, costumes and wigs are moved around and everything is made ready to receive the audience. From the principal singers, chorus and orchestra musicians to the creative teams for each opera, in addition to the many talented folks who don’t take a bow on stage, this blog offers unique insight, both thought-provoking and light-hearted, into the life backstage at San Francisco Opera.

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