Mezzo-soprano Renée Rapier is a second-year Adler Fellow who made her Company debut in last season's production of Rigoletto. Renée graduated from the University of Northern Iowa, and partcipated in the Merola Opera Program in 2010 and 2011, when she sang Rosina in Il barbiere di Siviglia. She has won numerous awards, including being a national finalist of the Bel Canto Vocal Scholarship Foundation Competition and a national semifinalist at the Metropolitan Opera Council Auditions in 2011. This season she has appeared in three company productions: as Pantalis in Mephistopheles, a Maid in Dolores Claiborne, and most recently as Meg Page in Falstaff. Here, Renée reflects on working with opera legends, her past life as a violist, and how you can tell a lot about a person by how they feel about Arrested Development.

Posted: 11/13/2013 by San Francisco Opera


It’s 6:54 pm and I’m warming up for the opening night of Falstaff; although not in the way one might imagine, scales and such. Instead, I’m doing lunges, hamstring stretches and sun salutations. Just as my muscles are loosening up comes a knock at the door from my (wonderful) makeup artist and the gears of the show begin to move. Soon “Places!” is called and I do one last stretch before I climb into my costume. If there’s one thing I’ve learned, it’s that Falstaff is an athletic event.

Posted: 10/11/2013 by Renée Rapier, mezzo-soprano


Today, pianist Robert Mollicone shares some reflections about his second and last season as an Adler Fellow. After completing his undergraduate and graduate studies at Boston University's College of Fine Arts, Robert was a member of the Spectrum Resident Artist Program at Virginia Opera and the Domingo-Cafritz Young Artist Program at the Washington National Opera. He was a participant in the 2011 Merola Opera Program. As an Adler Fellow, Robert has assisted on productions including The Magic Flute, Nixon in China, Moby-Dick, and The Secret Garden as well as productions with the Merola Opera Program. He has also worked with Boston Lyric Opera, Opera North, and the Baltimore Symphony. This season, he made his conductiong debut with San Francisco Opera at Opera in the Park in September, served as prompter for the world premiere of Dolores Claiborne, and will serve on the music staff of The Flying Dutchman. Below are his thoughts on his first time as a prompter and his first time conducting the San Francisco Opera Orchestra.

Posted: 10/11/2013 by San Francisco Opera


Our next Adler Profile features a native of Kiamusze, China: tenor Chuanyue Wang.  A first-year Adler Fellow and graduate of the 2012 Merola Opera Program, Chuanyue is an operatic star in his native China having won numerous talent competition awards including first prize in the Chinese Culture Ministry’s WenHua Competition, the Mandova Competition, the China International Vocal Competition, and the Chinese National Young TV Singers Competition. Prior to his Adler Fellowship, Chuanyue graduated from China’s Central Music Conservatory. This season, Chuanyue made his debut on the War Memorial Opera House Stage as Wagner & Nereo in Boito's Mefistofele and is also covering the role of Fenton in Falstaff.
Posted: 09/20/2013 by San Francisco Opera


This Friday, San Francisco Opera will celebrate the opening of our 91st Season with a gala opening night like none other. Co-chaired by Ann Girard and Mai Shiver, San Francisco Opera Guild’s sold-out 2013 Opera Ball: The Garden of Good and Evil will be created by celebrity event designer Colin Cowie and will reflect the celestial and devilish themes of the evening’s performance––late 19th-century Italian composer Arrigo Boito’s Mefistofele.



Posted: 09/03/2013 by Colin Cowie, Opera Ball 2013 Designer


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Introduction

Backstage at San Francisco Opera is a fascinating, fast-moving, mysterious and sacred space for the Company’s singers, musicians, dancers, technicians and production crews. Musical and staging rehearsals are on-going, scenery is loaded in and taken out, lighting cues are set, costumes and wigs are moved around and everything is made ready to receive the audience. From the principal singers, chorus and orchestra musicians to the creative teams for each opera, in addition to the many talented folks who don’t take a bow on stage, this blog offers unique insight, both thought-provoking and light-hearted, into the life backstage at San Francisco Opera.

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